Asset Forfieture

AbnMike

Well-known member
Apr 6, 2016
780
9
Morgantown, WV
OK, 65 years.

But then, you do know why that provision was put in the 14th, right? There was a whole class of people born here whose parents weren't citizens.

Which is exactly what you are arguing the case should be.
I do know why the provision was put into the 14th, and rightly so. Those people were brought here and were slaves and didn't have status. The 14th corrected that.

But it couldn't foresee there would be a time when there would be millions of people coming illegally and some of them giving birth, giving their offspring citizenship status.
 

fishEH

Well-known member
Jan 26, 2009
6,437
32
Lake Villa, IL
I think most understand that. The problem is that there is(was) nothing keeping them from seizing your vehicle for driving 55 in a 50. The Indiana general stated so when asked by the Supreme Court.
Let’s make sure we point out this guy isn’t riding in a 42k LR and just “selling to support his habit” like originally stated.

A lot of dealers know their shit is laced and also know it is very dangerous. They don’t care. They want that good stuff that keeps customers coming back.

Epidemic is real
When it’s mandatory for all first responders to have narcan.

I agree with less government and all. And that these laws should be used with care. These laws aren’t made to pad the pockets of the police department. They are made to hurt the career criminals. Not the every day working man. They also aren’t made to keep the poor down. A crack head isn’t gonna get his 78 coop seized.

If you don’t take their drugs guns money and cars, their right back in the game after they sign out on bond.

I forgot to mention, drugs fuel crime. If anyone has ever had anything stolen from them, it was probably an addict that stole it.
 

mgreenspan

Well-known member
Feb 28, 2005
4,430
24
Briggs's Back Yard
I'd imagine a system of armed drones could be more effective than a stationary wall. Some could take altitude imagery for identifying suspicious activity. Automated randomized patrol flight paths could be setup with manual intervention for unique scenarios. Low altitude drones could be equipped with lights/speakers to warn people off and armed to take action on the spot if warnings are ignored. hmm
Stopped reading the politics section for a while. I think a wall with patrols to enforce legal immigration and stop trafficking of contraband or humans is completely different than straight up death from above murder by drones to enforce legal immigration and stop trafficking of contraband or humans. Yes. drones could help automate, but I'm not sure you realize the infrastructure and man power required to operate drones that would effectively operate on the level required for a border this size.
 

SGaynor

Well-known member
Callsign: KN4KFS
Dec 6, 2006
6,068
25
48
Bristol, TN
According to Skorup's data, for instance, the Wayne State University Police Department seized $9 in cash in a 2017 case that never resulted in a criminal conviction. The Roseville Police Department seized $5 and a cell phone in another case that ultimately did end in a conviction.

Skorup says that, while there are large seizures that net huge amounts of cash, the data shows that it's used most often against petty amounts of money and people who have few resources to defend themselves, rather than El Chapo.

Of the total 2,078 cash seizures by Michigan law enforcement in 2017, the median value was $396, and the average value was $2,042. Overall, Michigan police seized $1.7 million in cash that was not accompanied by a criminal conviction.

"If you look at these files, we're not talking about a couple of flashy cases," he says. "We're talking about hundreds and hundreds of people that are never charged, or even hundreds more where they're charged, found not guilty, and the law enforcement proceeds with the forfeiture anyways."