P2098

disco_drum

Well-known member
Jan 27, 2006
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0
36
Fayetteville, GA
www.lykachamp.com
I have searched but found nothing really...


I am getting P2098 on my 08 LR3. It has around 175,000 miles. I am assuming this code is pointing to O2 sensors. Is that correct? I don't want to just throw parts at it. Any help would be appreciated!
 

discostew

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2010
4,524
11
Northern Illinois
Thing is. I looked at the Land Rover list of Pcodes and it seems to skip right over that one. And I had to go to a generic list of OBD2 codes to even find a description. I've seen generic trouble code readers come up with wrong #s somehow.

Rover has some strange ass fuel trim codes, but that one I'm having trouble finding. It's not a V6 is it?
 

squirt

Well-known member
Nov 13, 2008
796
2
Los Angeles
2098 is a Bank 2 code. Try swapping the O2 sensors (both pre- and post-cat) from side to side and see if it becomes a 2096. As an intermediate alternative, you could monitor the signals using an advanced OBD2 device or app like Torque.

It's reading lean on bank 2 for some reason. Could be a bad O2 sensor, or it could be a legitimate measurement that's caused by something upstream. (air leak, low fuel pressure, etc)
 

discostew

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2010
4,524
11
Northern Illinois
Well if you suspect that the left bank is running lean. I would start flushing the injectors. It makes sense. As far as the hard reset goes, I think its possible that resets the adaptions. Not 100% sure, just a little sure.
 

discostew

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2010
4,524
11
Northern Illinois
Here are my fuel trim readings. Are these normal?
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The problem with just seeing a picture of fuel trim at that moment is that trim is constantly changing. In the picture the only thing I see is the short term adding fuel and the long term taking it away. The thing I would want to see is the fuel adaptions readout. I think if you could get a look at fueling adaptions it would help.

Sometimes on these things you will see strange fuel trim or O2 imbalance faults and it ends up being a leak in the exhaust and probably near an o2 sensor. You might not hear the leak even, we find them with either a smoke machine or if you don't have one of those, I've stuffed a fender cover into the tail pipe to seal around a blow gun and have someone put pressure into the exhaust while I spray soapy water to look for leaks. Like checking a tire. I check the sensor to pipe sealing area. and the welds around the bung.

Any time you have a lean fault on the engine your working on you need to smoke check it for leaks in the inlet and exhaust. And after that start flushing injectors. During the years they put the 4.4 jag engine in Land Rovers the injectors changed from having 4 big holes to more smaller holes. They get restricted. I flush the injectors a couple times then recheck the fueling adaptions. Usually they start moving in the right direction.

One more thing. Bank 2 is the left bank.