Rockwell F80 Oscillating Tool

SGaynor

Well-known member
Callsign: KN4KFS
Dec 6, 2006
6,943
133
48
Bristol, TN
I can't believe I never bought one of these before...

I'm repairing/replacing the transom on a boat and needed something to cut into tight spaces. Usually use a back saw, but bought this.

Holy shit! This thing is great.

I was going to buy another Rockwell, but this one is on sale at Lowe's for $99. It's their top of the line model; the ones below it are $99 and $89.

With this model you can switch between 3.4* (generally standard on these types of tools) or 5* of oscillation. What a difference the 5* makes in cutting. Went through plywood 1.5" thick like butter.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/ROCKWELL-Sonicrafter-12-Piece-Corded-4-2-Amp-Oscillating-Tool-Kit/1000062605
 

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ezzzzzzz

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2010
579
2
SE Va
I've got a Craftman version I bought to cut the sealant in the access panel of my Key West. It worked like a charm. It has been used on a variety of projects successfully (no metal though). The time and effort it saves makes it invaluable.
 

jastutte

Well-known member
Nov 10, 2009
254
6
i have a Porter Cable with a quick release for changing blades. i don't need to mess with an allen wrench every time i ruin a blade or put it away.
 

JackW

Well-known member
Mar 17, 2005
619
20
The Fein brand oscillating tools are top dogs in this category - once you use one you're ruined.
 

AbnMike

Well-known member
Apr 6, 2016
1,055
53
Morgantown, WV
It used to be that the sawzall was an invaluable tool in demolition and household products.

These oscillating tools have resulted in my sawzall almost never leaving the peg board. I've got the cheaper Rockwell version, with a cord, but it has proved itself over and over.

Just recently used it in a bathroom demo where I wanted to save half the tile in the bathroom, with the diamond chip cutter it went through grout like butter. Also had to cut out rotten boards under a window, was able to slip it between the window and setting board and cut the nails out to remove it, without having to remove the entire window.

Last year I re-floored a house, and the flooring was thicker than what was removed. In olden times I'd have to remove the door trim and cut it, with this thing just make a shim and set the tool on it and cut the bottom of the door trim to the perfect size.

If you do anything around the house and don't have one of these you're wrong.

The cutters are expensive and if you hit a nail with the wood one it chews through your blade like butter, but they're still huge time savers.
 
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SGaynor

Well-known member
Callsign: KN4KFS
Dec 6, 2006
6,943
133
48
Bristol, TN
I'm almost convinced after being skeptical at first sight. Tried cutting any metal?
Update: I have used it to cut through metal - some rusted bolts/tierods on cars. Used a couple of the metal cutting blades but it worked. Got hot as hell too.

If you do anything around the house and don't have one of these you're wrong.
Look at that...we agree on something! 😋