2004 D2 Bottle Jack Fail

Swedjen2

Well-known member
Sep 12, 2018
552
111
California
Another cautionary tale - So I ran over a 1/4" dia. x 2" long screw which punctured the middle of a fairly new all-terrain tire. When I pulled out the 17 year old bottle jack - that was rarely, if ever used - and started pumping, the only thing that happened was I pumped out all the hydraulic fluid. I ended up barrowing an even older screw jack.
I suspect most of the older hydraulic jacks that are stored laying down are kaput. A forensic investigation determined that the old jack had been weeping fluid for some time which was not visible until the jack was removed from it's storage compartment in the engine bay.
Fortunately, I was in a downtown parking lot and close to home.

So boys and girls, another item to check and replace that most folks don't think about.
 

DiscoHasBeen

Well-known member
Aug 7, 2016
808
166
Indy
17 years of no use most likely lead to a brittle/dried out o-ring/gasket. Those things will need to be replaced from time to time.
 

discostew

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2010
6,372
476
Northern Illinois
The company that made the bottle jacks was one of the first long time vendors BMW fired when they owned Rover.
Another was the company that supplied leather for seats. That happened after they skipped some step in the tanning process and Disco2 rear seats grew hair. They sent us a shaver. The kind that’s supposed to take the pilling off a sweater. It was the craziest thing I’ve ever seen in 40 years in dealerships.
 

Blueboy

Well-known member
Apr 20, 2004
2,680
239
Back in the USA; Rockwood, PA
Thanks for the info. Need to check the D1 bottle jack as well as the Rangie. Pretty sure though the Rangie jack is stored vertically although thinking it depends on that foam insert position.
 

JohnB

Well-known member
Oct 18, 2007
2,279
8
Oregon
Easy to rebuild but pretty messy. O-rings will dry out eventually and it doesn't matter how you store it. Hard part is finding the correct o-ring. If you are like me you have several kits of 0-rings to mess with.
 

WaltNYC

Well-known member
Mar 3, 2010
579
61
NYC
I took my bottle jack to an hydraulic shop and the staff there helped me pick out the correct o-rings. Here is the list...

The real trick is to tap the metal base off the plastic body without cracking the plastic. I failed once and now have a 'parts' jack. Or, thought of another way, a jack missing the plastic body.

The 'Saddle', on which the axle of the truck sits, can simply be tapped off the top of the main shaft with a hammer. Again, don't hit the plastic body!

this list is for the jack on a D1 which I believe is the same as a D2. Not entirely sure however.

bottlejack, o-rings
1 - 568-127, OR-70NBR-1.4375x3/32-C/S(20), STANDARD O-RINGS
1 - 568-029, OR-70NBR-1.5x1/16-C/S(20), STANDARD O-RINGS
1 - 575-021, BU-90URE-15/16x1/16-C/S(10), STANDARD BACK-UP RINGS
1 - 568-021, OR-70NBR-15/16x1/16-C/S(50), STANDARD O-RINGS
2 - 568-018, OR-70NBR-3/4x1/16-C/S(50), STANDARD O-RINGS
 
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DiscoHasBeen

Well-known member
Aug 7, 2016
808
166
Indy
Easy to rebuild but pretty messy. O-rings will dry out eventually and it doesn't matter how you store it. Hard part is finding the correct o-ring. If you are like me you have several kits of 0-rings to mess with.

This. Get the jack out periodically and use it to lubricate internet components.