DII Cooling System Confusion

K-rover

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2010
2,098
43
Raleigh, NC
This is the exact reason my Rover went from a daily driver to a weekend camping truck. Too many odd ball things and with no local autopart stores stocking parts. It doesnt make sense to drive it daily. Mine has been pretty reliable in the grand scheme of things, but nothing like my Hyundai. I like having something I can just get in and drive with no worries and gets great MPG. Then jump into the Rover when I want to go have fun and drive something different. My coolant leak will have to wait until I have a free weekend and its not cold and raining.
 

SafariDave

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2008
92
0
Brooklyn, NYC
I am in the same boat with this 2000. New head gaskets, radiator, therm, water pump, etc. Drives fine for a week. Randomly it spits coolant out, off the back of the engine. I find it pooled at the front of the engine where the intake bolts are. So far I have checked all hoses, deleted the intake heater, blah blah. Temps run around 195-200 in town, 205-208 sitting at idle.
I guess a new cap is next. bought a pressure tester, sent it back because it would not pressurize. Another one arrived this weekend but have been too busy to even try.

I shit you not, this truck sat for 2 weeks, did not turn it over. In the garage, no leaks. Randomly dumps about half a cup of coolant behind the engine.

The only thing that worked on mine to stop the weeping of the HG at rear of engine was and is BG Universal Cooling System sealer.
Dave
 

SafariDave

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2008
92
0
Brooklyn, NYC
I am in the same boat with this 2000. New head gaskets, radiator, therm, water pump, etc. Drives fine for a week. Randomly it spits coolant out, off the back of the engine. I find it pooled at the front of the engine where the intake bolts are. So far I have checked all hoses, deleted the intake heater, blah blah. Temps run around 195-200 in town, 205-208 sitting at idle.
I guess a new cap is next. bought a pressure tester, sent it back because it would not pressurize. Another one arrived this weekend but have been too busy to even try.

I shit you not, this truck sat for 2 weeks, did not turn it over. In the garage, no leaks. Randomly dumps about half a cup of coolant behind the engine.

Those temps are correct if you are using the Standard Thermostat 187F. I have the 180F and my temps are 188F highway, 190-193F slow roads and stop signs. On long red lights, traffic /long idle 195-198F. Hottest its peaked has been 200-202F. Running on original water pump and fan clutch.
Dave
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,891
169
North Carolina
Fixing Land Rovers is a game designed to humble the mighty.

True that.

Imagine being short, like me. Short guy trying to work on the top end of a lifted DII... :)

That's actually my problem at the moment. My guts are all fucked up, and doing all that laying around on the engine and bending just isn't working for me.

Dude came back in the house and said: "Your Rover just puked all over the place"

My response at the time was to go out, have a quick look, and just walk back in with "fuck it" floating around in my mind.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

ukoffroad

Well-known member
Jan 13, 2010
1,857
85
Lynchburg, Va
I have a Volvo for a daily driver, this DII and the Series are just for fun. When I have issues I park them until life calms down and I can work on them.
 

JohnB

Well-known member
Oct 18, 2007
2,278
8
Oregon
Maybe the slow leak was the hose that finally just let go. I'd just replace the hose and see what happens.
Agreed that buying a good pressure test kit is really only something a mechanic would buy but sure nice to test shit when needed. I'm always amazed how you think a hose clamp is tight until you test with a pressure kit and find leaks everywhere.
 

kcabpilot

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2006
334
1
California
This may not be the same issue but when I did my head gaskets I put it back together with all new hoses and clamps and I fought little dribbles and leaks for a couple of weeks until I decided to go back to the original spring clamps. I had to buy a pair of those special cable operated pliers with the remote actuator and I had to learn how to use it and get those clamps perfectly positioned and square before releasing but it worked. I’m 100% sold on spring clamps now because they keep constant tension through any number of extreme heat cycle expansions and contractions. Once they are properly set they never give you any trouble and they don’t damage the hoses either. They also don’t wear out, you never have to replace them.

Touching on some of the other things discussed - I’ve never had much luck with those combustion gas detection kits. I think you would have to somehow get into the system at the exact time the problem is occurring which is when it’s piping hot and under pressure. By the time it’s cooled down enough to open the cap and do a sample it’s too late and you get a negative result. I know because I did dozens of tests with no positives on an engine that had a blown head gasket. The only time it would do it was when I was going up a hill. It would drive around on flat land or idle all day long and not overheat but as soon as I started climbing a hill it would start spitting out coolant. So only under conditions where it was impossible to use the block test kit.
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,891
169
North Carolina
I have a Volvo for a daily driver, this DII and the Series are just for fun. When I have issues I park them until life calms down and I can work on them.

With the exception of the uncomfortable, leaky inside and out, oddly-sized, incapable in bad weather or off road 2008 Dakota that enjoys breaking down all the time (could be a lemon, but I'd still stay away), the DII is actually the newest and best maintained vehicle I currently own. I simply let it sit and fail when I had to go through all that crap.

I'm still getting used to the stage when you exit the tunnel, look around, and wonder how you let shit get so fucked up. :)

Cheers,

Kennith
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,891
169
North Carolina
Maybe the slow leak was the hose that finally just let go. I'd just replace the hose and see what happens.
Agreed that buying a good pressure test kit is really only something a mechanic would buy but sure nice to test shit when needed. I'm always amazed how you think a hose clamp is tight until you test with a pressure kit and find leaks everywhere.

That's what I'm going to do; hose, thermostat, and cap. It's not going to cost much, and I need to be 100% confident in the vehicle.

If something else has to happen after that, it will. I'm not going to feel any better than I do now until that DII is ready to rock with no coolant loss at all.

I don't have a proper air compressor, actually. Sold it a while back because I never use air tools. If I knew what had an adapter that fits, I might look into it, but I'd be buying a bunch of stuff to make it work. The pumps I had built are far too powerful and immediate (150PSI at 150LPM), even though they could technically be used. It would be cheaper to buy an air compressor than to use them. At least it comes with a regulator.

So, the fact that I'd have to pick up a compressor or adapt what I've got is a factor. I only just now considered the Powertank, but one slip-up there and I'm in trouble, and the temperature could affect results.

Eh, I'll wait until those parts show up. I might be able to get a test done at the racing shop I use without buying anything, if it drives that far.

It's not as if I don't need the hose, anyway. I'm not going to be entirely comfortable until I give it a shot.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,891
169
North Carolina
This may not be the same issue but when I did my head gaskets I put it back together with all new hoses and clamps and I fought little dribbles and leaks for a couple of weeks until I decided to go back to the original spring clamps. I had to buy a pair of those special cable operated pliers with the remote actuator and I had to learn how to use it and get those clamps perfectly positioned and square before releasing but it worked. I’m 100% sold on spring clamps now because they keep constant tension through any number of extreme heat cycle expansions and contractions. Once they are properly set they never give you any trouble and they don’t damage the hoses either. They also don’t wear out, you never have to replace them.

Touching on some of the other things discussed - I’ve never had much luck with those combustion gas detection kits. I think you would have to somehow get into the system at the exact time the problem is occurring which is when it’s piping hot and under pressure. By the time it’s cooled down enough to open the cap and do a sample it’s too late and you get a negative result. I know because I did dozens of tests with no positives on an engine that had a blown head gasket. The only time it would do it was when I was going up a hill. It would drive around on flat land or idle all day long and not overheat but as soon as I started climbing a hill it would start spitting out coolant. So only under conditions where it was impossible to use the block test kit.

I don't know... I've hit it pretty hot, and the gasses won't boil off immediately; certainly not faster than I got that thing on there in my tests. If it was an internal leak pressurizing the system, I'd think it would have concentrated enough to let me catch it.

I've seen more false positives out of them than false negatives over the years, but you're right. It can happen. In my case, the loss generally happens when it's turned off. Still, you could be right.

Those pliers are really nice. I finally picked some up about a year ago, and it's one of those things you just don't know how you got by without. No more blisters with other pliers when they pop off the clamps and bite you. (y)

Cheers,

Kennith
 

Blue

Well-known member
Mar 26, 2004
9,381
451
AZ
My 2004 DII also holds pressure in the cooling system for days. I've just accepted the fact that my truck will sometimes smell like boiled coolant and I'll have to add a pint of purified water to the coolant tank every now & then. I take my truck to a well-respected independent shop for oil changes and every 3-4K miles and they give it a good all-around check when it's in for service. That reminds me...need to call Rov-N-Techs here in Scottsdale and make an appointment for service next week. Need an oil change and it sounds like my idler pulley bearings are on their way out again. And I'm occasionally leaking what I think is power steering fluid. Either that or some other piece of shit stock Land Rover component is on its way out (again). LOL
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,891
169
North Carolina
My 2004 DII also holds pressure in the cooling system for days. I've just accepted the fact that my truck will sometimes smell like boiled coolant and I'll have to add a pint of purified water to the coolant tank every now & then. I take my truck to a well-respected independent shop for oil changes and every 3-4K miles and they give it a good all-around check when it's in for service. That reminds me...need to call Rov-N-Techs here in Scottsdale and make an appointment for service next week. Need an oil change and it sounds like my idler pulley bearings are on their way out again. And I'm occasionally leaking what I think is power steering fluid. Either that or some other piece of shit stock Land Rover component is on its way out (again). LOL

Glad to see another person mention the pressure after sitting. I'd never noticed before, and I was really at a bit of a loss. My first instinct was the system pulling a vacuum as it cooled. Combine that with leaking after it cools while still remaining sealed, and I was scratching my head. At least I know now that it's supposed to hold that pressure; or at least it's not uncommon.

I think my idler needs to be replaced, as well. One of them is squeaking up there, anyway. That's usually the culprit, but I'll check when the hose comes in.

It fucking sucks, because that thing was slick as snot on a doorknob for a very long time. Used thoroughly, and it showed, but it was fucking clean.

Keep it up properly and focus on making sure everything is spotless, and it never really goes wrong. No leaks, no trouble in general. Then I let it sit... Once it starts, it's nearly impossible to stop entirely, and I personally believe it's the porous aluminum wicking fluid out around various gaskets once it's allowed to leak even once without immediate correction.

I will beat my head against this until it's back where it belongs, though. I get better every day, and I'll be on that engine with a damned toothbrush and polish when I'm ready, if that's what it takes.

That's how I know the heater core is fine. It'll pop when I'm done. :ROFLMAO:

Cheers,

Kennith
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,891
169
North Carolina
I do intend to finally adjust this cooling system, but it would be stupid to do it before I get it working right in factory trim.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

ukoffroad

Well-known member
Jan 13, 2010
1,857
85
Lynchburg, Va
Second attempt at pressure testing for me. this kit worked correctly, and I soon have water hitting the floor towards the front of the engine as well as off the back. I start taking things off the front, found the hose to the tank (I bypassed the throttle body heater nonsense) was leaking off the back of the hose, would never have seen it otherwise. Tightened that clamp, replaced another at the radiator and all is well.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_5602.pdf
    1.6 MB · Views: 7

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,891
169
North Carolina
Second attempt at pressure testing for me. this kit worked correctly, and I soon have water hitting the floor towards the front of the engine as well as off the back. I start taking things off the front, found the hose to the tank (I bypassed the throttle body heater nonsense) was leaking off the back of the hose, would never have seen it otherwise. Tightened that clamp, replaced another at the radiator and all is well.

Cool.

Which kit? I'm not opposed to picking something up if I know it'll work without a hassle. I just no longer have an air compressor, and I hate making adapters. The pumps I had made would absolutely need regulators. Those things are beasts designed to be the next step below Co2.

I wouldn't trust anyone in town aside from the Nissan dealership to do it for me; so it's not something I'll just drop off for quick diagnosis to avoid buying something, and they're not going to touch this thing. They're fine, but dealers for other manufacturers shouldn't really be expected to work on something else. They're solid, but it's not in their wheelhouse.

You know it's fucked up when I'm the best mechanic in town... They're all a bunch of lazy idiots, and a full 90% of them won't even touch a Rover because they either think the engines will universally drop liners, or they think it's exotic.

One of them almost got decked when he kept cutting me off before I could tell him I just wanted the asshole to find a leak; not rebuild the engine. The only other shop that's actually qualified likes to take things apart, not put them back together, and then try to collect a title.

There's a compressor next door, but I'm not sure what sort of regulator he has. I could nab one on Craigslist and resell it, though. Still, I'd want a good regulator that's been tested, and that may be expensive.

The parts will show up this week, I think.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,891
169
North Carolina
No air compressor required? I was imagining a different device entirely. I did look them up, but somehow "compressor" was stuck in my mind.

I'll certainly pay that to encourage more timely answers. Knowing it fits is the best part. I hate having to mail shit back all the time. Thanks, man. (y)

Now, watch me end up with the revised part number that replaces the DII fitting with something for an obscure Kawasaki lawn mower. If it's going to happen, it's going to happen to me. :ROFLMAO:

Cheers,

Kennith
 

JohnB

Well-known member
Oct 18, 2007
2,278
8
Oregon
Yes that's what works for finding leaks. Mine is an an old snap-on unit but pretty much the same as above.
 

StangGT5

Well-known member
Feb 4, 2019
78
19
Atlanta, GA
I am in the same boat with this 2000. New head gaskets, radiator, therm, water pump, etc. Drives fine for a week. Randomly it spits coolant out, off the back of the engine. I find it pooled at the front of the engine where the intake bolts are. So far I have checked all hoses, deleted the intake heater, blah blah. Temps run around 195-200 in town, 205-208 sitting at idle.
I guess a new cap is next. bought a pressure tester, sent it back because it would not pressurize. Another one arrived this weekend but have been too busy to even try.

I shit you not, this truck sat for 2 weeks, did not turn it over. In the garage, no leaks. Randomly dumps about half a cup of coolant behind the engine.

If you're finding it in the valley I'd double check the throttle-heater hoses. They may not be tight enough, especially if they're old or aftermarket. Just a guess.
 

StangGT5

Well-known member
Feb 4, 2019
78
19
Atlanta, GA
I hate to be that guy, but it could be a slipped liner pressurizing your system. If you cooked it and popped the headgaskets, that is not an uncommon outcome. I second what was said previously, check for exhaust gasses.