Skidsteer Loader / What do I need to know?

Tugela

Well-known member
May 21, 2007
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Seattle
Can't tell you much other than having worked alongside a Terex in Greenland and that thing was an impressive workhorse in tough conditions. No problems at all, other than when one of the drivers tipped it over, but these are the hazards of working on a glacier the size of Manhattan.

A-Star+Terex.jpg
 
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Maximumwarp

Well-known member
Mar 22, 2015
817
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Fairburn GA
The Cats are nice, but I'm biased since I work at a Cat dealer. They're very easily serviceable. You can get to all our filters via the rear door, but on Takeuchis you have to tilt the cab. Not sure if Bobcat, Kubota, and Deere are the same in that regard.

Technically, a skid steer has wheels. The ones with tracks are called CTLs (compact track loaders). You probably want a CTL if you'll be working off-pavement.
 
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terryjm1

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Jan 23, 2011
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I too have been considering buying one. I was told a bobcat 763 was the last of the best, before they became overly electronic.
 

DiscoHasBeen

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Aug 7, 2016
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Indy
The ones with tracks are called CTLs (compact track loaders). You probably want a CTL if you'll be working off-pavement.
Agreed. If the ground is soft at all ruts and getting stuck will become major problems.
They do some stuff really well yet a compact tractor will do more over the long run.
I was thinking the same thing, but there are jobs where a SS will outperform a compact tractor. Really would help to know what he has going on.
 

discostew

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Sep 14, 2010
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Northern Illinois
The place I’m buying has a big parking lot that’s in really bad condition. It’s about an acre big. Maybe a little less but at least 3/4 acre. I want to tear a lot of that out. Then snow removal it would help I figure.
 

DiscoHasBeen

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Aug 7, 2016
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Indy
The place I’m buying has a big parking lot that’s in really bad condition. It’s about an acre big. Maybe a little less but at least 3/4 acre. I want to tear a lot of that out. Then snow removal it would help I figure.
I'm not trying to be an asshole, but that's like saying I'm buying a Piper and flying it to the moon. What you are talking about is major excavation.
 
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discostew

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Sep 14, 2010
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Northern Illinois
Yeah that’s kinda what I’m starting to figure out. My friends kid could rip that whole thing out in a day. I figure I’ll rent one for a couple days and pay him to run it.
 
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discostew

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Sep 14, 2010
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Northern Illinois
I'm not trying to be an asshole, but that's like saying I'm buying a Piper and flying it to the moon. What you are talking about is major excavation.
I had a guy out here looking at it. The reason it came apart so bad is it’s a thin layer. It’s already coming up on it’s own. The logistics of getting it hauled out while he’s ripping it up will probably be my biggest problem.
If it’s going to take more time it would probably pay to own the thing, then sell it if I’m not going to use it.
The kid in me wants to own it. I could do all my snow removal at my house too. It’s a pretty big driveway. It’s like 75 feet long but real wide to I can turn around and not have to back out on the road. It’s 35 mph but it seems like the cool kids go faster
 

Levi

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Jul 27, 2004
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Cheyenne, WY
If you look at a cat, the diesel and hydraulic fills are both on the back and look the same except for the caps that get dirty. You might make sure the hydraulics haven’t been topped off with diesel or diesel treatment. It happened to the one at my work and it has a whine/groan it didn’t have before but has been trouble free otherwise.
 

DiscoHasBeen

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Aug 7, 2016
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Indy
I had a guy out here looking at it. The reason it came apart so bad is it’s a thin layer. It’s already coming up on it’s own. The logistics of getting it hauled out while he’s ripping it up will probably be my biggest problem.
If it’s going to take more time it would probably pay to own the thing, then sell it if I’m not going to use it.
The kid in me wants to own it. I could do all my snow removal at my house too. It’s a pretty big driveway. It’s like 75 feet long but real wide to I can turn around and not have to back out on the road. It’s 35 mph but it seems like the cool kids go faster
That's what I was wondering. When you first said parking lot I envisioned asphalt/ concrete. That's why I was like "good luck". Something to keep in mind, a skidsteer is a loader, not a excavator. You can push debris into a pile and load it, but you'll have poor results trying to dig with it. Unless you're dealing with sand/sandy loam.
 

terryjm1

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Jan 23, 2011
639
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For me, I would use it as a loader, fork lift, grapple, and occasionally clearing snow.. The cost of buying one, the first 2 jobs I would use it for would be the equivalent of what I would have to pay someone to do the work.
 

discostew

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Sep 14, 2010
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Northern Illinois
No it’s just a thin layer of asphalt that could probably lifted out with a shovel in some places. I know another guy who could deal with whatever piles the kid makes. He wouldn’t even need to trailer his loader. He’s real close
 

discostew

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Sep 14, 2010
6,278
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Northern Illinois
For me, I would use it as a loader, fork lift, grapple, and occasionally clearing snow.. The cost of buying one, the first 2 jobs I would use it for would be the equivalent of what I would have to pay someone to do the work.
I was surprised that you could get them as cheap as 12 large. It would be great to have.
 

DiscoHasBeen

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Aug 7, 2016
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Indy
I was surprised that you could get them as cheap as 12 large. It would be great to have.
No, no, no... In the vast majority of situations a compact tractor will be a better option. A much better option for a homeowner. Skidsteers have their place, but they are much more construction orientated.
 

discostew

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2010
6,278
441
Northern Illinois
No, no, no... In the vast majority of situations a compact tractor will be a better option. A much better option for a homeowner. Skidsteers have their place, but they are much more construction orientated.
I’m sure uyour right. But like Terry was saying the possible attachments is insane. Every job I see needing to do right now could be done by a skid steer. Maybe what makes it so much better for me is that it can operate in a much smaller space.