2020 Defender

K-rover

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2010
2,006
18
Raleigh, NC
Optimistic for what? Looks like 20" wheels and low profile tires on air suspension. If it comes with F+R lockers, Id be impressed, otherwise its a D5 with a different body.


Land Rover lost me after the D2. Im not interested in IFS/IRS for any sort of offroading. This will be a hit for the soccer moms and posers that like to say they have the latest and greatest. No different than most other luxury SUV's
 

kade

Well-known member
Oct 15, 2013
232
5
Upstate, SC
What’s so frustrating is that there is a market for real 4x4s and Land Rover refuses to acknowledge it. Them and most other manufacturers
 

garrett

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Jun 18, 2004
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www.overlandexperts.com
What?s so frustrating is that there is a market for real 4x4s and Land Rover refuses to acknowledge it. Them and most other manufacturers
Toyota and Jeep have both done a good job of keeping a firm hold for the general population of enthusiasts. Without those two brands, there would be nothing available for the US market. Maybe not exactly our ideal platform, but you can't deny them their success.

I believe the Ford Ranger and Chevrolet Colorado will continue to do well as that segment grows.

Land Rover continues to focus on the bi-curious male glider enthusiasts with a flair for bespoke urban boots and scarves.

What is there to be optimistic about in that photo?
 

Howski

Well-known member
Oct 19, 2009
973
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Greenville, S.C.
To me it’s an evolution of the D3/4 than the original Defender. Don’t kid yourselves this was going to be IFS/IRS since the old DC100 concept came out years ago. We’ll have to see it without the cladding but some of the styling is a bit off to me
 

Roverlady

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Apr 20, 2004
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My optimism lies in the body shape, rear-mounted spare tire, and nods to previous generations in alpine windows and a floating roof line. I am guessing modifications will come soon enough for the air suspension and tire size like have evolved for the LR3/4.

The new Jeeps still seem to be the best option for an off-road vehicle but they too are more luxurious and expensive, so I don't expect this to be bare bones in any way. I love our Rovers but the older they get the more I look for something to replace them and so far none of the new ones have seemed appealing. I have read great reviews about the new Discovery but I still hate the way it looks.

Unless you live on a farm or go to trail parks very few people are off-road regularly. Heck I've driven my Honda Pilot through mud bogged farm fields after a foxhunt and it has done remarkably well; I left the Disco at home because the heat/defrost doesn't work! If this new Defender could tow a horse trailer I would be even more excited but I'm not making bets on that capability. A removable top like the Series trucks would also be fun.
 

Roverlady

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Apr 20, 2004
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Optimistic for what? Looks like 20" wheels and low profile tires on air suspension. If it comes with F+R lockers, Id be impressed, otherwise its a D5 with a different body.

Land Rover lost me after the D2. Im not interested in IFS/IRS for any sort of offroading. This will be a hit for the soccer moms and posers that like to say they have the latest and greatest. No different than most other luxury SUV's
I'm hoping lockers will be an option. We all know wheel/tire size and suspension can be modified.

I agree with you to a point, but my 1995 DI was originally purchased by a businessman in Atlanta for a luxury SUV price at that time. Even Defenders in 1997 weren't all scooped up by off-road enthusiasts and people who appreciated them for their utilitarian design and function. ;)
 

Roverlady

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Toyota and Jeep have both done a good job of keeping a firm hold for the general population of enthusiasts. Without those two brands, there would be nothing available for the US market. Maybe not exactly our ideal platform, but you can't deny them their success.
I believe the Ford Ranger and Chevrolet Colorado will continue to do well as that segment grows.
I drove a 2018 Nissan Armada for a week and I had to admit it reminded me of my DI more than anything else has recently. More luxurious and lower ground clearance, but the tall roofline and heavy/torque-y feel were very comforting. I know they are based on the Patrol but have no idea how they could handle off-pavement terrain.
 

K-rover

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Jan 15, 2010
2,006
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Raleigh, NC
I'm hoping lockers will be an option. We all know wheel/tire size and suspension can be modified.
Maybe... These days bigger brakes mean that smaller wheel options are limited. Same with the suspension. Modern vehicles are becoming more computer controlled, which means modifying anything becomes a PIA.



I drive a Hyundai daily. Its comfortable, and gets great mileage. Has every option I could ask for, heated seats, nav etc.. The Rover for me anyway is a hobby. I only use it for camping and wheeling. Hell I only drove it 7-8 times this year, but it works perfectly for what I do.



Land Rover knows their market and knows that the majority of people wont ever go offroad, but they like that the brand says their vehicle can. Jeep is selling a crap ton of Wranglers. So Im not sure why Land Rover refuses to make at least one vehicle that can compete? Hell the majority of Wrangler owners only buy one so they can take the doors and top off to go the mall on a sunny day.



Personally Id like to see the new Defender with a solid rear axle, IFS up front and have multiple configurations, like a 2 door pickup or a soft top version. That would be more keeping with its roots than what we are seeing now. Ive always said the D2 will be the newest Rover I ever own. That still remains true.
 

discostew

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2010
4,776
45
Northern Illinois
Before you get worked up about the fucked up looking body, I read that they rolled it around with a "heavily modified Range Rover Sport body" So the only thing I take away from that is that it's going to be on the LR4/Sport platform. I hope that doesn't mean air suspension pavement princess. I would like to see a steel sprung truck with more simple systems on board.

I'm starting to think they plan to bring some new technology and systems out with this one.
 
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K-rover

Well-known member
Jan 15, 2010
2,006
18
Raleigh, NC
Disco5 or Rio. Decisions,decisions,decisions

Haha.. Yeah not exactly apples to apples. The Rio is made by Kia not Hyundai, and in 75,000 miles of ownership, Ive changed the oil, and replaced the tires. I dont think the same can be said for any Land Rover! And I bought it for half of what the D5 goes for.
 

rover4x4

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Apr 21, 2004
5,158
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36
North Carolina, Raleigh
dont kid yourselves one bit, Land Rover absolutely could care less about the thoughts of anyone on this forum. Land Rover will rely on computer controls to enhance offroad capability. If they do release a coil sprung version on the current IRS/IFS platform I would expect it to perform miserably. The "crosslinked" suspension that showed up on the L322 has been impressive and relatively reliable.

Rubicon wheel wells most likely accommodate 35" from the factory based on my cursory reading, it will be interesting to see how the "Defender" is configured. I am doubting it will have 33" tires or 17" wheels,

A modestly equipped Rubicon exceeds 45k, a 3k RRC with 32" tires and a rear locker should keep up with it no problemo.
 

ERover82

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Nov 26, 2011
3,228
98
Darien Gap
IFS/IRS needn't hinder capability, only its maintenance complexity.

Being based on the D4 platform, I hope they've engineered solutions to its weaknesses such as weight, body clearance, air/electronics vulnerability, wheel size, and tire clearance. If they've done that, it could be excellent. Might still be ugly though.
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,381
98
North Carolina
The thing will do fine on trails either way. What happens with terrain response may be odd to us, but people have been enjoying those features on pickups and other SUVs since they aped Land Rover's technology. Electronic lockers are fine. I'd almost rather have one than an air locker, honestly.

If the vehicle will function without those systems, there's not really an issue; rather like a DII without traction control. It's a wonderful system when it works, but when it doesn't you're still not stuck on the side of the road, and it's still a monster in the right hands.

It's funny how Land Rover is constantly picked on, when they're the origin of so much crazy technology and styling. They're now leading trends from styling right down to performance. That's an interesting development.

For me, the Defender is going to come down to what layouts they offer eventually. I'm sure it will be fine for most of what I'd do with it, but it's got some competition with the Jeep Gladiator (so long as it doesn't drive like anything Jeep has now), the Ridgeline, and AEV stuff off the rack, for me. I'm still not sure what the hell I want.

Land Rover could be producing a good middle ground here, but may reveal something that's actually got the brawn to back up the brains. Looks like we're finally going to find out soon.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

ERover82

Well-known member
Nov 26, 2011
3,228
98
Darien Gap
Rubicon wheel wells most likely accommodate 35" from the factory based on my cursory reading, it will be interesting to see how the "Defender" is configured. I am doubting it will have 33" tires or 17" wheels,

A modestly equipped Rubicon exceeds 45k, a 3k RRC with 32" tires and a rear locker should keep up with it no problemo.
Photos appear to be 20" wheels with 275/55R20 rubber, so 32s roughly. Not far off from 33s and there's still space in the wheel well.