DI Brakes Just Not Good Enough

CBiDrive

Well-known member
Sep 20, 2007
55
8
Parker, CO
That would be one axle.

Also just curious about why most think that the solid rotor/D110 setup on the front is better than the vented rotor/D90 setup. Personally I think I prefer the vented here in ColoRADo just for heat dissipation when I have a 20 mile 6% grade on some of the highways here. I was always able to feel the fade in the brakes on my old D1 on some of these descents.
 

fishEH

Well-known member
Jan 26, 2009
6,866
167
Lake Villa, IL
That would be one axle.

Also just curious about why most think that the solid rotor/D110 setup on the front is better than the vented rotor/D90 setup. Personally I think I prefer the vented here in ColoRADo just for heat dissipation when I have a 20 mile 6% grade on some of the highways here. I was always able to feel the fade in the brakes on my old D1 on some of these descents.
Ever had to clear the mud out of those vented rotors? I have. It's not fun.
 

RBBailey

Well-known member
Jul 26, 2004
6,753
3
Oregon
www.flickr.com
...just for heat dissipation when I have a 20 mile 6% grade on some of the highways here. I was always able to feel the fade in the brakes on my old D1 on some of these descents.
That is the reason for the vented. I looked at some testing that people have done and the only time performance discs/vented discs really proved to be better is when you were actually doing performance driving, or when on long hills. Otherwise, the differences were not really measurable for normal driving.
 
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terryjm1

Well-known member
Jan 23, 2011
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That is the reason for the vented. I looked at some testing that people have done and the only time performance discs/vented discs really proved to be better is when you were actually doing performance driving, or when on long hills. Otherwise, the differences were not really measurable for normal driving.
i went with vented 90 discs. Regular trips down a mountain highway with 26 miles of 6% grade was my reasoning. I downshift and let the engine do most of the braking but sometimes that isn’t completely feasible. I’ve had brakes overheat in my old triumphs. Few things are more frightening than standing on the brake pedal and next to nothing happens. Vented 90 discs are surprisingly inexpensive as well.
 
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terryjm1

Well-known member
Jan 23, 2011
490
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I also just ordered 110 rear calipers for my “new” D1. I just like the way the pads install as compared to stock D1. It needs brakes all around due to 8 years of inactivity and will use those and the 90 front vented ones. I buy regular old Wagner / Bendix semi metallic pads, around $20. Never had a problem.
 

CBiDrive

Well-known member
Sep 20, 2007
55
8
Parker, CO
I got my front kit (vented/D90) from Tillery here and trusted that he knew better than me. Not a lot of mud here in CO but it does happen. Nice thing is the rear disc conversion has D110 calipers. I am glad about that now after seeing peoples experience with them.
 
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p m

Administrator
Apr 19, 2004
14,608
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La Jolla, CA
www.3rj.org
The ABS light is either on or off depending on how the car feels. The code that I'm getting is 2 - 14, sensor failure. But... which sensor? And what to do about it?
Google for "Land Rover Discovery ABS code 2-14" - right on top of the search:
"Code 2-14 - Front left, too large an air gap or the sensor has been forced out by exciter ring. "
 
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discostew

Well-known member
Sep 14, 2010
5,851
316
Northern Illinois
Ok I'll do this again. When a wheel bearing gets loose on a Disco1 it will allow the axle to move around a little bit in the swivel housing. This wobble for lack of a better word will cause the reluctor ring on the axle to push the sensor out of the bore. This will cause the air gap to grow untill you get a condition called unwanted ABS stop. What that feels like is the car gliding thru an intersection and you should feel or hear some sort of ABS activity going on. The sensor is supposed to be pushed into the bore and bottomed out against the reluctor wheel on the axle. The Googled up description desribes the sensor getting pushed up out of the hole by the reluctor wheel. That was a little less of a condensed version of the same google desription. The fix is to tighten up your wheel bearings and push the sensor down into the hole. I avoid taking the sensors out of the hole because it's hard to get them out and getting them out can cause them to fail.

The other thing you could have going on is the seized up calipers already discussed in this same thread. I'll call that condition Brake Fade. Thats you pushing as hard as you can on the peddle but just can't stop. If your calipers are seized up then the tell tale willl be rust buildup on the rotor surfaces as if the car has been sitting, when it was never sitting for long enough to do that. The reason these pistons get rusted up is because there is no boot over the exposed piston when it's extendeddue to the pads getting thin. That surface is exposed to the elements on a Disco1.