2020 Defender

gimebakmybulits

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Dec 11, 2013
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Pasadena
That Tesla pickup is like a Series truck in that it just looks so fascinating it piques one's curiosity to drive it. In these times of crossover clone wars, being unique sells.
I agree, I think the only downside would be the $40k selling price. If they actually sold them at that price everyone and their dog would own one...goodbye uniqueness.
 

kennith

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Apr 22, 2004
10,687
131
North Carolina
$40,000 is much lower than I'd expect, but this is probably primarily a second or third car; or a mid-life crisis cure. It has to be at least somewhat reasonable.

It's crazy enough that it's unlikely to be super popular, and it's still an electric vehicle; so it's already on the lower-volume side of things.

Add to that the fact that most purchases are likely to be higher up on the option list, and it might not suddenly be seen everywhere. That would indeed take some of the fun out of it. The vehicle makes more sense if it's the nuttiest thing in town.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

kennith

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Apr 22, 2004
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North Carolina
We'll see what happens. I'm hopeful.

The Defender looks like a woman's car.
Looks like a damned convenient "all in one" vehicle, to me. It's not as butch, but then again neither is anything else they've ever made.

I just really question that rear door choice. I don't get it, and it seems like a dramatic utility limitation.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

kennith

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Apr 22, 2004
10,687
131
North Carolina
This is the part I just plain don't understand:

57696

What possible purpose can that serve aside from keeping the original style on the exact wrong part of the car?

How damned stiff do they think that body needs to be?

Mind you, they had many years to consider the dimensions of that cargo... Porthole. This was a deliberate, calculated decision.

Cheers,

Kennith
 
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DiscoHasBeen

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Aug 7, 2016
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Indy
I think 40 grand is what manufacturers think is that #. You have to spend that to get a Chevy pickup truck now.
I assume you are talking about a used truck. I mean you can buy a 2020 corvette that can go from 0-60 in 2.8 seconds for less than a loaded Silverado.
 

Blueboy

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Apr 20, 2004
2,163
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Back in the USA; Rockwood, PA
What possible purpose can that serve aside from keeping the original style on the exact wrong part of the car?
This. The original style.

Do think it is great to have on the D1 though. Goes along with the high roof line in the rear and makes loading tall items easy.
 

kennith

Well-known member
Apr 22, 2004
10,687
131
North Carolina
This. The original style.

Do think it is great to have on the D1 though. Goes along with the high roof line in the rear and makes loading tall items easy.
I'm talking about the width, though. It just doesn't make sense. It could be much wider that that.

I don't have a problem with the side opening; though of all the vehicles in their lineup that would be nice with a tailgate, it seems strange they didn't go that direction on the Defender. I'd have been happy with the compromise to have that extra bit of utility. Maybe something folds out, or there will be an option.

It looks like they have room to bolt something in there on that metal piece to which it appears they've attached the seats, or maybe I just missed an option.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

p m

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Apr 19, 2004
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Finally, got to see one in person, at the LA Auto Show.

It is amazing just how little interior space a 110 has. The roof appears to be 4 inches thick, rear pillars - shit, I once thought a D1's rear pillars were thick. It had nothing on new Defender.
Visibility is not bad - but mediocre; okay in front, poor on the sides, and nearly inexistent to the rear.
Front panel is awesome - it is the only part that invoke any Defender parallels, yet it is soft and leather-clad.
Gear shifter... my God, it is just one of these chicken drumsticks on front-wheel-drive voiturettes.

So... it may be the most-capable four-wheel-drive vehicle in the world, but, as John Lee aptly noted, if you took the Land Rover badges off that thing, you may not even know it was one.

Funny that Jeep and Land Rover are in different buildings. Land Rover hasn't even bothered to offer a single down-to-earth vehicle, with steel wheels, mud tires and whatnot. Every single Wrangler version, on the other hand, had 33" mud-terrains. In favor of Jeep, the front radius arms are far longer than those on all previous versions.

Still, Jeep is a strong competitor to Land Rover when it comes to build a large vehicle and make it useless inside. The slanted rear roof cage, clearly catering to bro-dozer crowd with cloth top, takes away at least a third of space from a 4-door wagon.

Then, there were Bollinger SUV and pickup. The only analogy I could think of was electric car built by Clarkson, May, and Hammond in Top Gear.
It is only unsurpassed in ugliness by a "Cybrtrk," but I punted on visiting Tesla show floor.

The only thing sensible for a person who desires to travel in a 4x4 is a Toyota 4-Runner. And it is boring as fuck, just as every one before it.

Sad. As far as "things to come" - there was nothing, not a single vehicle, that I would consider paying for with intention to replace what we currently have.

One other sad thing - it was a Sunday mid-day, and the show was pretty packed, yet there was NO ONE in the Buick corner of the world.
Bye Buick.
I remember seeing a then-brand-new Cutlass Siera in 1996 NAIAS and wanting it.
 
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kennith

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Apr 22, 2004
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North Carolina
The only thing sensible for a person who desires to travel in a 4x4 is a Toyota 4-Runner. And it is boring as fuck, just as every one before it.
I can deal with boring, given the aftermarket support, but that vehicle is just flat-out broken. I'd rather have a Hyundai.

Maybe the last few models were better, but damn... I wouldn't piss on the latest models to put out a fire. If it was a female, I wouldn't fuck it with your dick, Dan pushing, and DiscoPhoto pulling focus.

It's a shame what happened to Buick. This is a brand that could be pulled back out and updated, but they're just letting it rot. It won't last long.

I was wondering about interior space in the Defender, and was almost ready to say that only the 90 and 130 really make sense, but I hadn't seen one in person. Given your experience, I'm inclined to simply agree with you and go ahead and make that statement. I think the 130, whenever it's released, will make the most sense as a daily utility vehicle, but if visibility is that bad, I'm just not interested.

After seeing it, do you have any idea why they went with that tiny cargo door opening? I can't figure out why that much support is needed back there.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

Blueboy

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Apr 20, 2004
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Back in the USA; Rockwood, PA
So... it may be the most-capable four-wheel-drive vehicle in the world, but, as John Lee aptly noted, if you took the Land Rover badges off that thing, you may not even know it was one.
Thx for the write up. Great info!

Interesting aspect from John - wonder if that was the thought of folks when the RRC was introduced. 😁

Thx.
 
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kennith

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Apr 22, 2004
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North Carolina
Thx for the write up. Great info!

Interesting aspect from John - wonder if that was the thought of folks when the RRC was introduced. 😁

Thx.
Well, until that point they only had a single vehicle in their lineup, so it didn't really get in the way; though it did herald the arrival of coil springs, and I don't imagine people were too enthusiastic about that being rolled over into the later Defender at first. It's still seems a little odd to me that the RRC was sold alongside the Series III for four years.

It was also an absolute beast in initial form, though; weighing only around 3,800 pounds or so with a 1,500 pound payload capacity. It had great angles and outstanding utility. Handling was impressive for the dimensions and in general, it was very comfortable on long, rough rides, and visibility was excellent. I still think the two door is where it's at with Range Rovers.

I've driven a lot of them, and one of these days I'll get off my ass and buy one.

Cheers,

Kennith
 

p m

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It is a legit comparison and legit question.
The introduction of a Range Rover was a radical departure upmarket from building farm trucks.
It brought about performance and complexity; I would argue that RR brought far more performance than complexity, without much of a sacrifice in reliability.

But then Land Rover elected to keep building the luxury and farm tracks alongside, for the next 45+ years.
The new Defender (with or without quotes) is an admission that (a) we can't build reliable farm trucks and (b) we don't give a shit about them anymore.
 
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p m

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I've just been told about this.
Awesome, a truck laden with lithium batteries and body panels made out of .120 Stainless steel out-tows an empty F150.
Big Fucking Deal.
The F150 will continue to motor on, for about 600 miles. Then it will top off the tank in 3 minutes and be ready for another 600 miles. All the while the driver of the cocaine-haze brainchild of Elon Musk will be looking for a donkey dick to consume because the nearest nuclear power station is in Mexico.
 

DiscoHasBeen

Well-known member
Aug 7, 2016
153
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Indy
There's no doubt that electricity gives you huge advantages over internal combustion engines. When you can put a motor on each wheel..... But besides the charging problems when does a rig become too capable? Ain't much fun wheeling by yourself because no one can go where you can. Then you have the, when you do get stuck your really fucking stuck and no one around to help.